Circus of Maxentius
Circus of Maxentius
4
Les revenus influencent le choix des expériences présentées sur cette page : en savoir plus.
Circus of Maxentius : les meilleures façons d'en profiter 
La région
Adresse
Quartier: Ardeatino

Contrôle des avis
Avant publication, chaque avis passe par notre système de suivi automatisé afin de contrôler s’il correspond à nos critères de publication. Si le système détecte un problème avec un avis, celui-ci est manuellement examiné par notre équipe de spécialistes de contenu, qui contrôle également tous les avis qui nous sont signalés après publication par notre communauté. Les avis sont affichés par ordre chronologique dans tous les classements.
4.0
4,0 sur 5 bulles15 avis
Excellent
7
Très bon
4
Moyen
4
Médiocre
0
Horrible
0

Ces avis ont été traduits automatiquement depuis leur langue d'origine.
Ce service peut contenir des traductions fournies par Google. Google exclut toute garantie, explicite ou implicite, en rapport aux traductions, y compris toute garantie d'exactitude, de fiabilité et toute garantie implicite de valeur marchande, d'aptitude à un usage particulier et d'absence de contrefaçon.

claudio d
Viterbo, Italie38 984 contributions
4,0 sur 5 bulles
août 2023
Inside the archaeological area known as "Villa di Maxentius" (and located between the 2nd and 3rd mile of the Appia Antica), among the remains of the complex built at the beginning of the 4th century by the emperor Maxentius, a place of the foreground certainly goes to the Circus. It is an arena for chariot races of more than considerable dimensions (probably second only to that of the Circus Maximus), being 512 meters long with a central spine of 296 meters and a width of 92 meters. With these measures it is difficult to support the hypothesis that it was only a circus for private shows of the emperor and any of his guests. Today the steps are no longer there, the emperor's stage is a ruin, as is almost the entire prison complex, and there are no remains of the spina (which had swimming pools, sculptures and an obelisk: the latter is today in Piazza Navona). what walls invaded by grass; but the structural perimeter is substantially intact and this allows us to still appreciate its shape and dimensions; the impressive remains of the lateral towers of the prisons and the openings that follow one another between the perimeter walls offer suggestive views (also towards the nearby mausoleum of Cecilia Metella); the Porta Triumphalis, on the short curved side, and the Porta Libitinensis, in the center of the long southern side, have also reached us. Entrance to the archaeological area of the Villa of Maxentius is always free.
Écrit le 18 août 2023
Cet avis est l'opinion subjective d'un membre de Tripadvisor et non l'avis de Tripadvisor LLC. Les avis sont soumis à des vérifications de la part de Tripadvisor.

takau t
Tokyo, Japon1 206 contributions
3,0 sur 5 bulles
juin 2019
アッピア街道をのんびり散策した時に立ち寄りました。古代ローマのキルクス(戦車競技場)跡です。ほぼほぼ跡形もないです。
Écrit le 4 avril 2020
Cet avis est l'opinion subjective d'un membre de Tripadvisor et non l'avis de Tripadvisor LLC. Les avis sont soumis à des vérifications de la part de Tripadvisor.

D4NI_W
Latium, Italie849 contributions
4,0 sur 5 bulles
févr. 2020 • Entre amis
Purtroppo abbiamo potuto vederlo solo da fuori perché chiuso per lavori di restauro. Il cartello all'esterno segnala la riapertura per il 29 febbraio...torneremo.
Écrit le 3 février 2020
Cet avis est l'opinion subjective d'un membre de Tripadvisor et non l'avis de Tripadvisor LLC. Les avis sont soumis à des vérifications de la part de Tripadvisor.

LoveToTravelTerrie
Frisco, TX1 307 contributions
3,0 sur 5 bulles
juil. 2019 • En couple
We stopped in while walking the Appian Way (about mile 3 from the entrance of the trail). There was no charge to get in but we put a donation in the box that was close to the entrance. Although the place was mostly basic ruins, there were a few helpful info panels. It was amazing to think of it being busy and full of people back in the day.

There were 2 other buildings in the ruins in addition to this track. Each place was a fair distance from each other so took a bit of walking. There was a tractor mowing the fields so maybe some upkeep/improvements going on.
Écrit le 25 juillet 2019
Cet avis est l'opinion subjective d'un membre de Tripadvisor et non l'avis de Tripadvisor LLC. Les avis sont soumis à des vérifications de la part de Tripadvisor.

Em B
Brisbane, Australie87 contributions
5,0 sur 5 bulles
juil. 2019 • En solo
Quickly stop in and visit the Circus of Maxentius when you are on the Appian Way. It's free, its quick and it seems to be as well preserved as the Circus Maximus but without the fee.
Écrit le 8 juillet 2019
Cet avis est l'opinion subjective d'un membre de Tripadvisor et non l'avis de Tripadvisor LLC. Les avis sont soumis à des vérifications de la part de Tripadvisor.

Paul R
Wellingborough, UK776 contributions
5,0 sur 5 bulles
mai 2019 • En solo
The Appian way is a fantastic site in itself, but is studded, to either side, with historical attractions to visit. I was impressed by all of those I saw but this was definitely my favourite.
The ruins of the villa and circus are picturesque, dramatic and fascinating. The grounds surrounding the site are beautifully kept and planted and there are well maintained information boards at several key points that give a good feeling of what the place would have been like in its day.
The whole site is set in lush countryside and surrounded by green woodland.
The site is free to visit and, although there is a donation box, nobody appears to take note of whether you contribute or not, less still pressurise you to do so. Having said that, I think most people will feel a donation is in order for such a well organised and interesting site.
Écrit le 12 juin 2019
Cet avis est l'opinion subjective d'un membre de Tripadvisor et non l'avis de Tripadvisor LLC. Les avis sont soumis à des vérifications de la part de Tripadvisor.

phat_dawg_21
Alpharetta, Géorgie15 050 contributions
3,0 sur 5 bulles
avr. 2019 • En couple
This race track was smaller than the better known Circus Maximus, holding only approximately 10,000 spectators, but is much better preserved. It is the second largest of all circuses, only beaten by Circus Maximus. It is the best preserved of all Roman circuses.

In the ruins you can see the outline of the 500 meter long racing track as well as the two gate towers. These towers would have contained mechanism for raising the starting gates to allow the chariots to race down the track.

It was known until the 19th century as the Circus of Caracalla. It was during the track excavation in the 19th century, that archeologists found an inscription which dedicated the circus to the “divine Romulus”. This was what helped the historians to identify the circus as Circus Maxentius, rather than the Circus of Caracalla.

Good signage in English.

Admission is free
Écrit le 3 mai 2019
Cet avis est l'opinion subjective d'un membre de Tripadvisor et non l'avis de Tripadvisor LLC. Les avis sont soumis à des vérifications de la part de Tripadvisor.

David B
El Barco de Avila, Espagne651 contributions
3,0 sur 5 bulles
avr. 2019 • En couple
This is a free site on the Via Appia Antica between the Tomb of Cecilia Matella and the catacombs. We wandered in and found a site which preserves the circus of the emperor Maxentius which from the information panels must have been impressive in its day. The towers at the start of the racing area are well preserved and you then see the grassed area which formed the circus. Nearby is a Mausoleum supposedly built for Maxentius' son Romulus which preserves some decoration and which you can go inside. There are also apparently some palace remains but we could not find these!
Écrit le 2 mai 2019
Cet avis est l'opinion subjective d'un membre de Tripadvisor et non l'avis de Tripadvisor LLC. Les avis sont soumis à des vérifications de la part de Tripadvisor.

Tommaso612
Rome, Italie522 contributions
5,0 sur 5 bulles
janv. 2019 • En couple
Agli inizi del IV secolo dopo Cristo, l’imperatore Marco Aurelio Valerio Massenzio (meglio noto semplicemente come Massenzio) fece costruire per sé e per i suoi famigliari un circo sui terreni di sua proprietà, al miglio III della Via Appia. A causa della sua funzione essenzialmente privata, questa struttura poteva ospitare al massimo poche migliaia di spettatori; invece i maestosi circhi pubblici della Roma imperiale (primo tra tutti il Circo Massimo) ne contenevano decine di volte di più.
Comunque, a parte le ridotte dimensioni delle tribune, il Circo di Massenzio non differiva molto dagli altri. Aveva anch’esso una forma ad “U”: sui lati chiusi sorgevano le gradinate per gli spettatori; sul lato aperto (un colonnato imperniato su due grandi torrioni simmetrici) si trovavano i “carceres”, ossia le barriere dalle quali le bighe scattavano a gran velocità all’interno dell’impianto, dando inizio alle gare. Queste ultime avvenivano su un circuito coperto di sabbia, a forma di ovale molto allungato, con al centro la cosiddetta “spina”: una struttura lineare, spesso fantasiosamente decorata, avente lo scopo di dividere la pista in due lunghi rettilinei, collegati alle estremità da altrettante curve piuttosto strette. L’abilità dei conducenti delle bighe (detti aurighi) consisteva soprattutto nel riuscire a non sbandare in curva, mantenendo al contempo un’elevata velocità.
A differenza delle arene (come ad esempio il Colosseo) dove avevano luogo i sanguinosi combattimenti tra gladiatori o con le fiere, nei circhi si svolgevano di norma soltanto corse ippiche. Va detto, peraltro, che nel tempo anche quest’ultima forma di spettacolo assunse un’importanza enorme: si formarono potenti gruppi di aurighi, identificati da divise di diversi colori, sostenuti da vere e proprie bande armate di tifosi che si scontravano in maniera spesso cruenta, lasciando morti e feriti sul terreno. A Costantinopoli, in particolare, le fazioni di tifosi arrivarono addirittura, in alcuni casi, a imporre l’elezione degli imperatori romani d’Oriente.
I circhi dell’antica Roma non vanno nemmeno confusi con gli antichi stadi, come ad esempio quello di Domiziano, oggi diventato Piazza Navona. Nella pista di questi impianti, lunga appunto uno “stadio” (ossia circa 180 metri, corrispondenti all’omonima misura lineare d’origine greca) si svolgevano le gare tra atleti: corse, lanci, lotte, ecc.
Il Circo di Massenzio, detto anche di Romolo in onore del figlio dell’imperatore morto in giovane età e poi divinizzato, era lungo quasi mezzo chilometro e largo circa 90 metri. Al centro della spina fu collocato un grande obelisco egizio risalente al II millennio avanti Cristo. Il manufatto, proveniente da Syene (l’odierna Assuan) era stato trasportato a Roma due secoli prima per iniziativa dell’imperatore Domiziano, che forse lo utilizzò per ornare un tempio, o una sua villa vicina alla città. I geroglifici e i simboli tracciati sul monolite non sono però antichi come quest’ultimo, che ne era in origine privo: si tratta di un’abile opera d’imitazione di qualche artista romano del I secolo dopo Cristo.
Del Circo di Massenzio restano oggi larghi tratti del muro di cinta, i due torrioni che sostenevano il porticato e significative tracce della spina centrale. Nel 1650 l’obelisco, caduto in pezzi e ricoperto dalle erbacce per tutto il Medioevo, fu restaurato e installato a Piazza Navona di fronte alla Chiesa di Sant’Agnese in Agone (per questo il manufatto è oggi noto come “obelisco agonale”). La complessa operazione fu diretta dal grande architetto Gian Lorenzo Bernini.
Questo circo faceva in origine parte di un grande complesso edilizio al quale appartenevano inoltre una sontuosa villa, anch’essa intitolata a Massenzio, e il ricco Mausoleo del giovane Romolo. A causa della sconfitta a della morte dell’imperatore (avvenuta il 28 ottobre 312 durante la battaglia di Ponte Milvio) non tutti gli edifici previsti furono portati a termine; il circo fu utilizzato soltanto per qualche anno. Con l’ascesa di Costantino il Grande sul trono di Roma e la “damnatio memoriae” decretata nei confronti del suo rivale, il sito fu presto abbandonato e dimenticato.
Écrit le 6 février 2019
Cet avis est l'opinion subjective d'un membre de Tripadvisor et non l'avis de Tripadvisor LLC. Les avis sont soumis à des vérifications de la part de Tripadvisor.

Thaumasios
Pignone, Italie3 915 contributions
5,0 sur 5 bulles
déc. 2018 • En couple
Spettacolare estensione, oggi ricoperta dal verde, di cui sopravvive la spina centrale, lunga circa 300 metri . Colpiscono e rendono stupefatti le dimensioni; 513 metri di lunghezza e 90 di larghezza. La costruzione è in opus listatum . Oltre alla spina, l’elemento intorno al quale i carri dovevano ruotare e invertire la direzione, sopravvivono i “carceres”, gli stalli da cui uscivano i carri e la torre, unico esemplare di quelle che costeggiavano l’impianto
Écrit le 23 décembre 2018
Cet avis est l'opinion subjective d'un membre de Tripadvisor et non l'avis de Tripadvisor LLC. Les avis sont soumis à des vérifications de la part de Tripadvisor.

Résultats 1-10 sur 15
Les revenus influencent le choix des expériences présentées sur cette page : en savoir plus.
S'agit-il de votre page Tripadvisor ?
Vous possédez ou gérez cet établissement ? Prenez le contrôle de votre page pour répondre gratuitement aux avis, mettre à jour votre page et bien plus encore.
Prenez le contrôle de votre page

CIRCUS OF MAXENTIUS (Rome): Ce qu'il faut savoir pour votre visite (avec critiques)

Tous les hôtels : RomeOffres sur les hôtels : RomeSéjours de dernière minute : Rome
Rome : toutes les activités
Excursions d'une journée à Rome
RestaurantsVolsLocations vacancesRécits de voyageCroisièresVoitures de location